Category Archives: NatNews

White-nose fungus detected in Texas

Sometimes, “firsts” are exciting, like when an infant takes his first steps or a young angler catches her first fish. But when it comes to wildlife diseases, the first detection of a disease in a state is not exciting news. At the end of March, biologists reported the first detection in Texas of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats. Hibernating bats that tested positive for the fungus came from six North Texas counties: Childress, Collingsworth, Cottle, Hardeman, King, and Scurry. White-nose fungus thrives in cold climates and… Read More →

Ranch Management University

Are you new to ranching?  Do you have questions about the fundamentals of ranch management, such as soil fertility, the nutrient requirements of cattle, or wildlife habitat management? Ranch Management University (RMU) is a program offered by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service twice a year that provides education about ranching to new and inexperienced ranchers.  This spring’s RMU will be held April 3-7 in College Station.  The program will include both lectures and demonstrations by AgriLife specialists. For a list of topics and more information, check out the AgriLife… Read More →

Warmer weather ahead

Texas’ warmer-than-usual winter isn’t really news at this point. What you might be interested to learn, however, is that we might be in for a warmer-than-usual spring, as well. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) forecasts weather for the entire country, including predictions that stretch out months from now. Just released late last week, the most recent three-month forecast gives a 50/50 probability that the warm weather in Texas will continue for the next three months. The precipitation forecast indicates equal chances of the next three months being dry,… Read More →

Black-capped vireos proposed for delisting

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has recently proposed that black-capped vireos (Vireo atricapilla) be removed from the federal list of endangered species. Black-capped vireos were listed as an endangered species in 1987, when scientists estimated that just 350 remained in the wild. Today, over 14,000 black-capped vireos breed throughout Oklahoma, central Texas, and a small area of north-central Mexico. The population declines were attributed to habitat loss and nest parasitism by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), a native invasive species. Black-capped vireo recovery has been attributed to improvements in… Read More →