Juniper Ecology and Management

1997 Juniper Symposium Proceedings


Parties Involved

Authors and Symposium Participants

  • Dr. Jim Ansley Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University Research and Extension Center, P.O. Box 1658, Vernon, TX 76384
  • Bill Armstrong Assistant Area Manager, Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept., Kerr Management Area, Rt. 1 Box 180, Hunt, TX 78024
  • Dale Brandenberger CEA for Kimble County, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, Box 427, Junction, TX 76849
  • Dr. Carlton Britton Professor, Texas Tech University, Dept. of Range, Wildlife and Fisheries, Box 42125, Lubbock, TX 79409-2125
  • Dr. Richard Connor Professor, Texas A&M University, Dept. of Agricultural Economics, College Station, TX 77843
  • Dr. William Dugas, Jr. Professor and Resident Director, Texas A&M University, Blackland Research Center, 808 East Blackland Road, Temple, TX 76502
  • Don Ethridge Professor, Texas Tech University, Dept. of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Box 42132, Lubbock, TX 79409-2132
  • Dr. Sam Fuhlendorf Post-doctoral Research Associate, Texas A&M University, Dept. of Rangeland Ecology and Management, College Station, TX 77843
  • Matthew Garriga Graduate Student, Texas A&M University, Dept. of Rangeland Ecology and Management, College Station, TX 77843
  • Alfonso Gerbolini Former Graduate Student, Dept. of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Texas Tech University. Current Address, General Borgono 546, Miraflora, Lima 18 Peru.
  • Justin Hester Project Manager, Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, P.O.Box 658, Temple, TX 76503
  • Ray Hinnant Research Associate, Texas A&M University, Dept of Rangeland Ecology and Management, College Station, TX 77843
  • Dr. Ed Huston Professor and Acting Resident Director, Texas A&M University Research and Extension Center, 7887 N. Hwy 87, San Angelo, TX 76901 Phillip Johnson Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University, Dept. of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Box 42132, Lubbock, TX 79409-2132
  • Robert Langford Rancher, Star Rt. Box 74, Strawn, TX 76475
  • Dr. Karen Launchbaugh Assistant Professor, University of Idaho, Dept. of Range Resources, Moscow, Idaho 83844-1135
  • Dr. Allan McGinty Extension Range Specialist, Texas A&M University Research and Extension Center, 7887 N. Hwy 87, San Angelo, TX 76901-9714
  • Rob Mitchell Assistant Professor, Texas Tech University, Dept. of Range, Wildlife and Fisheries, Box 42125, Lubbock, TX 79409-2125
  • Susan Mullins Graduate Student, Texas Tech University, Dept. of Range, Wildlife and Fisheries, Box 42125, Lubbock, TX 79409-2125
  • Steve Nelle Wildlife Biologist, Natural Resources Conservation Service, 33 E. Twohig, Room 108, San Angelo, TX 76903
  • Dr. Keith Owens Associate Professor, Texas A&M University Research and Extension Center, 1619 Garner Field Road, Uvalde, TX 78801
  • Robert Pritz CEA for Wise County, Texas Agricultural Extension Service, 205 N. State, Suite 100, Decatur, Tx. 76234
  • Rudi Reinecke Graduate Student, Texas A&M University, Dept. of Rangeland Ecology and Management, College Station, TX 77843
  • Stan Reinke Range Management Specialist, Natural Resources Conservation Service, 33 E. Twohig, Room 108, San Angelo, TX 76903
  • Dr. Dale Rollins Extension Wildlife Specialist, Texas A&M University Research and Extension Center, 7887 N. Hwy 87, San Angelo, TX 76901
  • Dr. Fred Smeins Professor, Texas A&M University, Dept. of Rangeland Ecology and Management, College Station, TX 77843
  • Erika Straka Graduate Student, Texas A&M University, Dept. of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, College Station, TX 77843
  • Dr. Charles Taylor Professor and Station Superintendant, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, P.O.Box 918, Sonora, TX 76950
  • Dr. Amy Thurow Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University, Dept. of Agricultural Economics, College Station, TX 77843
  • Dr. Tom Thurow Associate Professor, Texas A&M University, Dept of Rangeland Ecology and Management, College Station, TX 77843
  • Dr. Darrell Ueckert Professor, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, 7887 N. Hwy 87, San Angelo, Tx 76901-9714
  • David Wester Graduate Student, Texas Tech University, Dept. of Range, Wildlife and Fisheries, Box 42125, Lubbock, TX 79409-2125

Foreward

The purpose of this book is to provide greater insight into the ecology and biology of juniper and how it impacts rangeland productivity including hydrology, livestock, vegetation, wildlife and the ranching enterprise. We will also emphasize the management of juniper by various control methods including chemical, mechanical, fire and biological and the commercial uses of juniper. We hope that our audience includes students, ranchers, wildlife biologists, agribusiness and other agricultural professionals and the growing segment of the public interested in natural resource management.

Our approach has involved the synthesis of research from other locations but we have concentrated mostly on research generated by the Texas A&M University System. The central theme of this book is to provide a basic understanding of juniper with a minimum amount of scientific jargon. Each author has written their respective chapter at a level that should be easily understood by the novice who is serious about learning about juniper and its effects on our Texas rangelands.

Juniper infestation of Texas rangelands is an important dilemma because of its impact on forage and livestock production, water yield and quality, wildlife habitats, and rapidly increasing costs of conventional control methods. Blueberry juniper (Juniperus ashei) is a serious problem on approximately 10 million acres and redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) on 12 million acres of the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains. The invasion of juniper is readily apparent; however, information regarding the effects of juniper on rangelands is scarce. Hopefully this book will be read and understood by a wide array of the public so that all can understand better the effects of juniper on our rangeland resources.

Charles A. Taylor, Jr.
Professor & Research Station Superintendent
Texas A&M University Research Station
Sonora, Texas 76950


Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Environmental and Land Use Changes: A Long-term Perspective.

Chapter 2 Environmental and Economic Tradeoffs Associated with Vegetation Management on the Edwards Plateau.

Chapter 3 Biology, Ecology and Ecophysiology of Juniper.

  1. Biology and ecology of redberry juniper.
  2. Estimating Ashe juniper leaf area from tree and stem characteristics.
  3. Ecophysiology and growth of Ashe and redberry juniper.
  4. Biology and ecology of Ashe juniper.

Chapter 4 Holistic Perspective, Rangeland Hydrology and Wildlife Considerations in Juniper Management.

  1. Holistic perspective on juniper.
  2. How an increase or reduction in juniper cover alters rangeland hydrology.
  3. Cedar through the eyes of wildlife.

Chapter 5 Juniper Control and Management.

  1. Brush Busters: A program to market tactical brush management technology to landowners.
  2. Elevated chaining of juniper.
  3. Two least-cost and effective Ashe juniper control case studies.
  4. Improving the efficacy of goating for biological juniper management.
  5. Juniper control and management.
  6. Juniper burning at Texas Tech.
  7. Current research on redberry juniper at Texas Tech University.

Chapter 6 Economics of Juniper Control.

Chapter 7 Interactions Between Grazing, Fire, Weather and Juniper.

  1. Juniper as forage: an unlikely candidate.
  2. The role of grazing management in overcoming juniper.
  3. Long-term importance of grazing, fire and weather patterns on Edwards Plateau vegetation change.

Chapter 8 Commercial Uses, Policy Issues and Options of Juniper in the Edwards Plateau.

  1. Commercial value of juniper on the Edwards Plateau, Texas.
  2. Juniper management in the Edwards Plateau: Policy issues and options.