Category Archives: NatNews

Invasive species… and more invasive species

A recent study revealed that globally, about one-fourth of all invasive species are “new” invaders, meaning that they have not previously been invasive in other areas. In other words, although we can predict that certain species will become invasive in new environments, there are other species that may invade even though they haven’t caused problems elsewhere. An example of an animal that we know is invasive is the wild pig (Sus scrofa). Just about anywhere wild pigs are introduced, they become a major invasive problem. On the other… Read More →

New publication: Texas Water Law

If you’ve never visited the Texas Agriculture Law Blog, now is a great time to check it out! In a recent post, Extension Agricultural Law Specialist Tiffany Dowell Lashmet released a new publication called “Basics of Texas Water Law.” Given this year’s water theme on TexNat, this is a timely publication! Both groundwater and surface water are addressed in this concise, easy-to-read paper. These concepts are applicable not just for agriculture producers, but also for those who use ground and surface water for wildlife.

Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society – 2018 Conference

This year’s meeting of the Texas Chapter of The Wildlife Society (TCTWS) will be held at the Sheraton Dallas and will focus on the topic “The relevance of conservation to a diverse society: how to make it a reality.” The excellent list of plenary speakers includes Dr. Steve Williams, President of the Wildlife Management Institute; Ms. Becky Humphries, CEO of the National Wild Turkey Federation; Dr. John McDonald, President of The Wildlife Society, and Ms. Tina Yturria Buford, Director of Education for East Foundation. The annual TCTWS conference… Read More →

Hurricanes, floods, and wildlife

As Texans continue to recover from the impacts of Hurricane Harvey, and with hurricane season far from over, many people have questions about how these events affect wildlife. Quail are particularly prone to the effects of rainfall. Find out more in this short video by Texas Wildlife Association: Quail vs. Hurricane

Wildlife and flooding

When a natural disaster strikes, wildlife have limited ways to respond. Floods commonly displace many species from their usual homes and allow other species to access new areas. As the water recedes, people may be surprised to find wildlife in unusual places. Most wildlife displaced by flooding is simply trying to find food and shelter. However, if people are unaware of their surroundings, negative encounters with displaced wildlife can result. One particular concern during post-disaster cleanup is snakes. Debris piles created during a storm attract snakes for several… Read More →

Are you ready…

… for hunting season?! Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) has released dates for the 2017-2018 hunting season. Check out the details here, and learn more about the animals you are hunting through the resources in our Game Management section.

Got wildlife? Get facts!

If you have wildlife on your land (all Texans, raise your hands!), you need to know good management practices for dealing with that wildlife, whether you want to increase quail numbers, improve antler production, or reduce wild pigs. The problem is that mixed in with all the good information out there about wildlife management is plenty of bad information. All management techniques take resources — time, money, and effort — and all land managers have limited resources. Bad information, which leads to poor management, does more than potentially… Read More →

White-nose fungus detected in Texas

Sometimes, “firsts” are exciting, like when an infant takes his first steps or a young angler catches her first fish. But when it comes to wildlife diseases, the first detection of a disease in a state is not exciting news. At the end of March, biologists reported the first detection in Texas of the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats. Hibernating bats that tested positive for the fungus came from six North Texas counties: Childress, Collingsworth, Cottle, Hardeman, King, and Scurry. White-nose fungus thrives in cold climates and… Read More →

Ranch Management University

Are you new to ranching?  Do you have questions about the fundamentals of ranch management, such as soil fertility, the nutrient requirements of cattle, or wildlife habitat management? Ranch Management University (RMU) is a program offered by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service twice a year that provides education about ranching to new and inexperienced ranchers.  This spring’s RMU will be held April 3-7 in College Station.  The program will include both lectures and demonstrations by AgriLife specialists. For a list of topics and more information, check out the AgriLife… Read More →

Warmer weather ahead

Texas’ warmer-than-usual winter isn’t really news at this point. What you might be interested to learn, however, is that we might be in for a warmer-than-usual spring, as well. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) forecasts weather for the entire country, including predictions that stretch out months from now. Just released late last week, the most recent three-month forecast gives a 50/50 probability that the warm weather in Texas will continue for the next three months. The precipitation forecast indicates equal chances of the next three months being dry,… Read More →